Keynotes

SusTech 2024 Keynotes and Plenary Speakers

All times and dates shown in Pacific Time (UTC-7)

April 16, 1:00 pm

ReCell: Working to Advance Battery Recycling

Eva Allen, Applied Materials Department, Argonne National Laboratory
April 17, 2:15 pm

Efficient, Cost-Effective Polymeric Materials Design for Clean Energy and Biomedical Technologies via Biomass Valorization

Shudipto Konika Dishari, Ross McCollum Associate Professor, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
April 15, 3:30 pm

A Vision for Mid-Century Sustainable Urban Transportation

Tyler Folsom, University of Washington Bothell

ReCell: Working to Advance Battery Recycling

Eva Allen, Applied Materials Department, Argonne National Laboratory

Abstract:

End-of-life lithium-ion batteries in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles are just now starting to reach their end of life. Battery recycling is needed to recover the valuable materials needed to support new battery production and reduce waste and environmental impact. The ReCell Center is working to develop, scale up, and demonstrate battery recycling processes that reduce cost and increase the profit of battery recycling. ReCell has developed direct recycling processes to recover cathode materials intact, reducing the processing steps for reuse. Four focus areas are targeted: direct cathode recycling, recovery of other materials, design for recycling, and modeling and analysis. Additionally, ReCell uses advanced characterization with synchrotron sources to study the directly recycled cathode materials in 3D to determine their composition after regeneration and gain a fundamental understanding of the direct recycling processes.

Dr. Eva Allen is a Materials Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory’s Applied Materials Department. She has nine years of experience in cathode synthesis, process-scaleup, and electrochemical testing, beginning before her Ph.D. at Argonne National Laboratory from 2015-2017. From Argonne, she pursued her PhD in inorganic chemistry at the University of Illinois Chicago in 2022 with Prof. Jordi Cabana. After defending in 2022, She returned to Argonne for her postdoc in the battery recycling group ReCell at Argonne National Laboratory. Here, she worked on developing synthetic processes for recycled cathode materials for reuse. Through her synthetic work, she has applied techniques of advanced 3D imaging using synchrotron sources to gain a comprehensive understanding of recycled cathode materials to improve the regenerative processes for reuse.

 


Efficient, Cost-Effective Polymeric Materials Design for Clean Energy and Biomedical Technologies via Biomass Valorization

Shudipto Konika Dishari, Ross McCollum Associate Professor, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Abstract:

Addressing the technical challenges through cutting-edge materials research is the key to excel in sustainable, clean energy technologies, like fuel cells and electrolyzers. Some of the major challenges of current H-fuel cells include ion transport limitation (low-temperature), stability (high-temperature), expensive materials, and environmental sustainability. To overcome these obstacles, we need to rethink the design of ion-conducting polymers (ionomers) playing the pivotal roles in separators and catalyst layers of these devices. Converting the untapped, industrial/agricultural lignin-rich wastes to design efficient, cost-effective ionomeric materials for eco-friendly electrochemical devices can aid in bio- and energy economies simultaneously. The major application of lignin in sustainable energy materials has so far been porous carbon materials for charge storage and/or electron conduction in electrodes. We have designed ion-conducting materials using lignin from plant-based sources. This talk will primarily show how these lignin-based polymers improve the ion-transport at low- and high-temperature conditions. We consolidate the findings on average as well as distributed physical, mechanical and ion transport properties across lignin-based ionomeric materials to understand the ion transport process which can inform and guide the future design of  sustainable energy technologies. The talk will also give a glimpse of how we are designing functional materials using lignin for biomedical applications.

Dr. Shudipto Konika Dishari is currently a Ross McCollum Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). Dishari worked as a post-doctoral fellow in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering at Penn State. She received her Ph.D. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the National University of Singapore. Dishari’s research focuses on designing polymeric nanomaterials to impact sustainable energy and biomedical technologies.

Dishari has received several honors/awards in recognition of her research and teaching excellence, including, the DOE Office of Science Early CAREER Award (2019), NSF CAREER Award (2018), 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award (2021), American Chemical Society Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering (ACS PMSE) Young Investigator Award (2023), NUTech Emerging Innovator of the Year Award (2020), WEPAN Accelerator Core Concept Award (2022), American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Midwest Conference Best Paper Award (2023), UNL Distinguished Teaching Award (2023), Harold and Esther Edgerton Junior Faculty Award (2019), Baxter Young Investigator Award (2014), and more. Dishari is an associate editor of the Journal of Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage (JEECS), an ASME journal. Dishari is also the current elected Chair of Area 8A (Polymers) in the Materials Engineering and Science Division (MESD) of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

 


A Vision for Mid-Century Sustainable Urban Transportation

Tyler Folsom, University of Washington Bothell

Abstract:

Near-term sustainability goals focus on eliminating greenhouse gases. Transportation is a major contributor to GHG and sustainability requires eliminating petroleum as well as fossil fuels used for vehicle electrification. To effectively guide that action, this talk envisions how sustainable transportation improves on business as usual. The present paradigm of wasting energy on a 4000-pound vehicle to haul one or two people is not sustainable. The future requires going beyond bike share, automated automobile and automated transit networks. When these technologies are merged, small, choreographed pods could end congestion. People move faster, and at lower economic and energy costs. Freight can be moved more efficiently. A key to efficient energy use for passengers and freight is to make the vehicles lighter than the load. Light vehicles require fewer batteries, with beneficial effects on the grid.

Dr. Tyler Folsom is a creative thought leader who sees a strong connection between vehicle electrification, automation, and concern for climate change. They are an Affiliate Professor at University of Washington, Bothell. They received a BS in Mathematics from Villanova University, MA in Math from University of Maryland and MS and PhD in Electrical Engineering from University of Washington. They were part of a team that wrote the real-time control software system for two unmanned spacecraft at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and have done engineering R&D projects at Quest Integrated as the Principal Investigator for NSF, Air Force, Navy, Army, and private clients.

Dr. Folsom participated in the DARPA Grand Challenge races for autonomous vehicles. Thy have taught robotics, artificial intelligence, machine vision, embedded systems, software engineering, autonomous vehicles and digital electronics. They are an avid bicyclist, having biked around the world, and promote using autonomous cycles to build a transportation system that uses 30 times less energy than cars at the same speed. Research projects involve self-driving tricycles, which have been featured on TV several times. Dr. Folsom has written over 50 papers and technical reports, an e-book and is a senior member of IEEE.

 

 

 

 

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